Title Indlish
Subtitle The Book for Every English-Speaking Indian
Author Jyoti Sanyal, Edited by Martin Cutts
ISBN 9788130902814
List price Rs 695.00
Price outside India Available on Request
Original price
Binding Paperback
No of pages 418
Book size 140 x 216 mm
Publishing year 2014
Original publisher Viva Books Private Limited
Published in India by Viva Books Private Limited
Exclusive distributors Viva Books Private Limited
Sales territory Worldwide
Status In Stock
About the book
  
 


Reviews:

Life and English will never be the same again, after these 388 pages.
-The Week

Enraged polemic though this book may be, it is also constructive, collected and funny. Where it is angry, it is righteous anger because the evils it condemns - if left unchecked - are likely to kill English as a truly expressive medium for journalistic and business writing in India. . . . This book may be the last hope for reform.
-Martin Cutts, Research Director, Plain Language Commission, UK Author of the Oxford Guide to Plain English

Sanyal is a crusader for plain English. . . He gives tips, aided by quotations from some of the world"s greatest journalists, on how to write better, more engaging English. . . Comical and caustic by turn, the collection is always constructive and should be handed out to every trainee (and the odd senior) reporter hl the country, or simply to anyone who wants to write clear, focused English or who wants to understand the peculiarities that permeate "Indlish".
-Lilly Peel, The Statesman

. . . relief from language that obscures.
-The Financial Express

Every word I write, every sentence I compose, and every redundant word I dare to think of now goes through the lens of "Indlish". I wonder if that last sentence was too long? Jokes aside, Indlish is, perhaps the best book on Indian English.

-Saurabh Saklani, Moneycontrol.com

. . . a valuable primer for those wanting to take up writing as a profession.
-India Today

. . . if you read. . . the examples given in the book, it will not be necessary to refer to Macmillan or other books to improve your English.
-Siddharth Khandekar, Maharashtra Times

Divided into short, crisp chapters, the book takes the reader through a quick and often amusing journey through the different problem areas in Indian English. A brief sneak-peak into why we speak the way we do, what writers need to keep in mind ,and how spoken English should not be borrowed from our own mother tongues - these are some of the main topics that Sanyal has focused on.
-Deccan Chronicle

People who make a big deal about how much English they know. . . will find many things to learn from this book. . . It is definitely a must read for people interested in writing better English. The book is enlivened with Sarbajit Sen"s many illustrations.
-Ishwar Daitota, Samyukta Karnataka

In lively language, with a light touch, and through a fun-loaded method, Jyoti Sanyal has sought to speed towards modern, concise English those of us who know little English, and yet sound pompous.
-Indranil Ghosh, Saptaahik Bartaman

Sanyal shows the common mistakes that Indians make while speaking English, and also talks about ways of overcoming them. . . this book is not just for journalists or for mass communication professionals: it"s a book meant for every English-speaking Indian.
-Anant, Deshonnati

. . . It is the best book for journalists, ... and for those who wish to use English language flawlessly.
-Sakal

. . . deep study of prevalent un-English usages and common defects. . . gives with illustrations the correct, modern and plain style of English language.
-Daily Excelsior

What makes the author"s elaborate analysis. . . interesting are the numerous examples (news reports, editorials and features) he quotes from Indian media. . .
-The Hindu

Indian English, or rather Indlish, desperately needs. . . reform. Sanyal has taken the first step.
-Imteeaz Kacho, The Kashmir Times

Undoubtedly, Indlish: The Book for Every English-Speaking Indian is a useful and practical guide for all Indians simultaneously blessed and cursed by Macaulay"s gift of the English language. . . it is a recommended handbook to all journalists in particular, as also to academics, and corporate communicators.
-Education Wodd

In the battle against the corruptors of English, Sanyal"s arrows first strike the journalists. But all Indian "circumlocutors" of English are in the strike range. Sanyal"s Indlish reminds that writers" reading must include books about language.
-Jose Panachipuram, Bhashaposhini

Description: Do Indians equate ‘impressive’ English with incomprehensible English? Many unfortunately do. The clumsy Victorian English hangs like a dead albatross around each educated Indian’s neck. Our feudal culture frowns on directness of expression. Indian English is often no more than an Indian language in disguise. With this funny, quirky book Jyoti Sanyal launches an all-out war against bad English and offers modern-day antidotes to archaic Indlish.

Contents: And I thank. . . • Foreword by Martin Cutts • You must be armed! By Ravindra Kumar

Part I: MAKING A BOTCH OF WRITING • See-sawing to plain English • The familiar abuses. . . are now on hold • The whirligig of circumlocution • Bugs in our pens • Tell, don"t preach • The clatter of clutter • Clutter bugs • Shrink or sink • The logic of it • The secret of bad writing • The cult of vagueness

Part II: THE LETTER WE WRITE • Cancel forthwith under intimation. . . • As per your esteemed order of the 26th ult . . . • Of false starts • Of breech-delivery formats

Part III: JOHN COMPANY BABOO AS HACK • Case for the defence • He noted, and said and added • Meanwhile, he pointed out • Two miscreants aborted, and escaped • Criminals with calling cards • The member charged. . . and the minister assured • With regard to the matter regarding. . . • In their respective dhotis and saris, respectively • A facility for facilities • This involves the involvement of . . . • Making an issue of it • Indulging in fraudulent activities • Words without meaning

Part IV: USAGE INDLISH STYLE • She is having two daughters • I have seen that film last week • This condom costs very less • On Sunday, I went to my native • Write it today itself and post it tomorrow itself • People have different different tastes

Part V: THOSE TROUBLESOME MIDGETS • I also don"t like that film • He is equally as good as . . .  • No parking both sides • Balancing with both • Only where it belongs • Clinton even took care to get photographed. . .

Part VI: MOTHER TONGUE, OTHER TONGUE • Let"s plainspeak • The lady with mahogany legs • Jest choop and chel • Enemy fire had been responded to • The complexity arises from the fact that . . .  • The point is sought to be evaded • May the lowliest be permitted. . . • Can you give me one glass of water? • That leaves us none the wiser than. . .  • Lover, you are very that thing • Why worry about small small things?

Part VII: YOUR READER DESERVES BETTER • Make me see • Show, don"t tell • The role people play • Tell me a story • Dodging visual detail • Writer, be quiet! • The sound of talk • The power of dialogue • Utterances no one uttered • Set the scene; get them talking • Dialogue in your daily • The voice of the narrator

Index

About the Author: Late Jyoti Sanyal, after 30 years with The Statesman, where even his friends thought him hot-headed, choleric and impatient, Jyoti Sanyal became Dean at Asian College of Journalism, Bangalore, in 1997. Remembered as a hound in class and a lamb outside it by the trainees he inspired with his love of both story-telling and expressive language, Sanyal then devoted himself to Clear English India (www.clearenglish.in), which encourages people to use good contemporary English instead of Raj-day commercialese.

 
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